Medea – REVIEW

Medea

By Venus Zarris

In what can best be described as the ultimate character defining performance, Melissa Lorraine blazes across the stage of Theatre Y’s remarkable production and becomes Medea. Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned and Medea throws open hell’s gates to deliver catastrophic wrath upon her opportunistically philandering husband, Jason. Rage so complete can easily fall into a one-dimensional portrayal, yet Lorraine’s Medea fires on so many emotional and intellectual cylinders that we are taken with her on a mesmerizing descent into well articulated madness.

Photo-F

Poet Robinson Jeffers has penned a beautiful adaptation of Euripides’ horrific tale of betrayal and revenge, made even more lyrically lovely and dramatically bleak by this macabre staged hallucination. Director Kevin V. Smith takes us on a theatrically Dali-esque journey through the text of this classic tale by realizing a stream-of-consciousness dreamscape. The surreal backdrop of fluctuating artistic imagery and dramatic styles jolts the story out of its conventionally classic milieu and blasts the audience into a thought provoking unreality. Smith throws Medea down Alice’s rabbit hole and what emerges through this wild looking-glass is a sometimes inspired, sometimes distracting, yet always fascinating purgatorial suspension of disbelief.

Theatre Y presents a rare artistic collaboration between an artist, Melissa Lorraine, who grounds the story in staggering emotional authenticity and an artist, Kevin V. Smith, who bewilders the text with fantastically stylized kaleidoscopic surrealism.

Photo-E

Just as Katharine Hepburn defined Violet Venable in Suddenly, Last Summer or Patti LuPone defined Eva Peron in Evita or Margaret Hamilton defined the Wicked Witch of the West in The Wizard of Oz, Melissa Lorraine defines Medea. We feel for her anguish, we grasp the gravity of her unrelenting dilemma and we are horrified by who she is transformed into. Lorraine commands the focus; she reveals every intimate devastation and diabolical dreadfulness of Medea. She owns the stage and the completeness of her performance affords Smith the latitude to play as he wishes with all other aspects of the production. There is not another actor in Chicago who could manifest Medea so resplendently atop such whimsical directorial artistic license. You will be hard pressed to find another actor anywhere who could create a Medea as nuanced and as eviscerating.

Photo-O

Aaron Lamm and Nicholas Wenz deliver performances that are wise beyond their years as Medea’s children. Simina Contras brings a hypnotic ferocity to the stage with her physically overwhelming and emotionally beguiling performance as Medea’s devoted servant, The Nurse. Kevin V. Smith and Hugo Duhayon’s improvisational work with the Chorus of Corinthian Women bookends the production in a very present and contemporary context of genuine and personally poignant revelation. The exceptional costume, makeup and hair design by Branimira Ivanova and lighting design by Devron Enarson add intriguing visual depth to this unique interpretation.

Photo-G

Once again, Theatre Y creates a production that is as extraordinary in vision and delivery as it is provocative and captivating. You will be challenged and rewarded by this incredible offering. You will be absorbed by the imaginative twists and turns of the staging. You will be haunted by the heart wrenching intensity and creative chaos of this singular Medea.

 

3 1/2 STARS

 

(“Medearuns through June 1 (Thursdays-Sundays at 7pm) @ Theatre Y, 2649 N. Francisco Ave. located in St. Luke’s Lutheran Church of Logan Square. 708-209-0183)

Medea production photos by Devron Enarson.

Theatre Y